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equalityandthecity:

I just backed Pier Kids: The Life on @Kickstarter http://kck.st/1aiuq1R

alex&piper forev <3

alex&piper forev <3

New girl meets old girl amirite?

New girl meets old girl amirite?

film-dot-com:

REVIEW: “BLUE JASMINE&#8221; (Directed by Woody Allen)
SCORE: 8.5 / 10
Though Woody Allen has limited his on-screen performances in recent years (he’s only cast himself once since 2006’s “Scoop”), it’s never been more obvious that the bespectacled iconoclast appears in all of his films. For Allen, the movies are not a place to escape but rather a place to reflect and refract, his characters offering a kaleidoscopic window into their creator’s kvetching soul.
Over the course of Allen’s 50-year career, he’s evinced a remarkable, Zelig-like capacity to bend any genre to his will – the only thing less believable than the fact that “Sleeper” and “Crimes and Misdemeanors” were made by the same man would be the idea that they weren’t.
It’s true that the best of Allen’s recent films – namely “Vicky Christina Barcelona” and “Match Point” – ostensibly seem to resist betraying the identity of their maker, his authorial presence muted by the reverb of intriguing foreign locations and uncharacteristically earnest depictions of beautiful people having perfect sex. And yet, in some respects, the period that began with 2004’s “Melinda and Melinda” has been Allen’s most fixedly auteuristic, the famously prolific filmmaker churning out ten consecutive stories that are each in some way consumed by thoughts of double lives and second chances. It seems that the Bronx Bumbler, so reverent of Bergman, has in his twilight years become enchanted by Kieslowski – his life story all but told save for the epilogue, Woody Allen has naturally began to look back and consider what might have been. In a recent interview with the L.A. Times, Allen conceded: “I never trust people who say, ‘I have no regrets. If I lived my life again, I’d do it exactly the same way.’ I wouldn’t.”
And so we arrive at “Blue Jasmine,” perhaps Woody Allen’s best film since 1994’s “Bullets Over Broadway&#8221;…
READ THE FULL REVIEW ON FILM.COM

film-dot-com:

REVIEW: “BLUE JASMINE” (Directed by Woody Allen)

SCORE: 8.5 / 10

Though Woody Allen has limited his on-screen performances in recent years (he’s only cast himself once since 2006’s “Scoop”), it’s never been more obvious that the bespectacled iconoclast appears in all of his films. For Allen, the movies are not a place to escape but rather a place to reflect and refract, his characters offering a kaleidoscopic window into their creator’s kvetching soul.

Over the course of Allen’s 50-year career, he’s evinced a remarkable, Zelig-like capacity to bend any genre to his will – the only thing less believable than the fact that “Sleeper” and “Crimes and Misdemeanors” were made by the same man would be the idea that they weren’t.

It’s true that the best of Allen’s recent films – namely “Vicky Christina Barcelona” and “Match Point” – ostensibly seem to resist betraying the identity of their maker, his authorial presence muted by the reverb of intriguing foreign locations and uncharacteristically earnest depictions of beautiful people having perfect sex. And yet, in some respects, the period that began with 2004’s “Melinda and Melinda” has been Allen’s most fixedly auteuristic, the famously prolific filmmaker churning out ten consecutive stories that are each in some way consumed by thoughts of double lives and second chances. It seems that the Bronx Bumbler, so reverent of Bergman, has in his twilight years become enchanted by Kieslowski – his life story all but told save for the epilogue, Woody Allen has naturally began to look back and consider what might have been. In a recent interview with the L.A. Times, Allen conceded: “I never trust people who say, ‘I have no regrets. If I lived my life again, I’d do it exactly the same way.’ I wouldn’t.”

And so we arrive at “Blue Jasmine,” perhaps Woody Allen’s best film since 1994’s “Bullets Over Broadway”…

READ THE FULL REVIEW ON FILM.COM

film-dot-com:

MICHAEL CERA AND SEBASTIAN SILVA LEAVE THE PRESS A NOTE 
saw this on the table next to me while i was waiting to talk to Michael Cera and director Sebastián Silva at the “Cystal Fairy&#8221; junket. good times. gooooood times. 

Catch Michael Cera in Crystal Fairy now playing in select theaters

film-dot-com:

MICHAEL CERA AND SEBASTIAN SILVA LEAVE THE PRESS A NOTE 

saw this on the table next to me while i was waiting to talk to Michael Cera and director Sebastián Silva at the “Cystal Fairy” junket. good times. gooooood times. 

Catch Michael Cera in Crystal Fairy now playing in select theaters

languagethatiuse:

Mr. Henri Serre and Mr. Oskar Werner dancing in a scene from Francois Truffaut’s 1962 film “Jules et Jim&#8221;.

languagethatiuse:

Mr. Henri Serre and Mr. Oskar Werner dancing in a scene from Francois Truffaut’s 1962 film “Jules et Jim”.

thefilmfatale:

Donald O’Connor and Gene Kelly get a visit from Fred Astaire, behind the scenes on the set of Singin’ in the Rain

thefilmfatale:

Donald O’Connor and Gene Kelly get a visit from Fred Astaire, behind the scenes on the set of Singin’ in the Rain